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Quall Assassin: Book 5 Of The Citadel 7 Saga

Quall Assassin: Book 5 Of The Citadel 7 Saga
Author: Yuan Jur
Publisher: WaaDoom

Book review by Michael Radon

 

"'For what you have done to my Analuke, I allow you to see my true face. Consider this a parting gift.'"

The Citadel 7 Superverse series continues in this fifth novella, highlighting the code and behavior of the reclusive and mysterious Quall. Those that have been following the story will be familiar with the world and some of the more prominent characters already, but because of the nature of this series, it’s not at all prohibitive for newer readers to start here and work their way through the other books at their own whim. Despite the shorter form of a novella, the author does a splendid job of building out the world of Tora and its differing races, cultures, and natural features. Blending the genres of science fiction and fantasy, this story is an imaginative, entertaining read and worthy of consideration for any reader who likes to be thrust into an unfamiliar situation, working out the details as they go along.

 

Read more at: Quall Assassin - The US Review of Books

US Review of Books

 

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Superverse in Brief Blog 9

Character Inspirations

 

Where the hell do any of the coolest characters come from in a totally fictional setting? When I started writing Citadel 7 it was because I was using it as a recovery catharsis after having two strokes, dying twice and losing a career serving the public as Abbot of a Buddhist temple for a decade or two. Big changes back then.
So, the inspiration for my characters had to come from somewhere right? As a theologian, I’d read thousands of manuscripts on ideology and the belief systems mankind has developed to justify his existence. Some of it could have been drawn upon, other aspects were biscuit dry drivel for the easily lead mind. I eventually turned to near past and present day observations of people and events to begin the foundation for the story narrative, heroes and villains who’d step forward as key players in the Citadel 7 Superverse ®. For the main hero of the story, that was easy, I modeled Commander Bloch and his life story from book 1 Enemy of Existence - On Earth on my son. A handsome man now a professional soldier, a multifaceted individual with a sharp wit accompanied by a no bullshit attitude toward doing the right thing and the most loyal friend anyone could ever have. My daughter became the warrior princess, Nattai, in book 3 Coming Storm. Smart, intelligent, beautiful inside and out. As their father, perhaps I was motivated to leave them something to read when their old man is dust, a keepsake to remember me by. But more so, it was because they had the personalities to fit the characters I needed to walk the worlds I was building. I could see them in those roles such that, if fantasy was reality and they were in another life and time, it just might be them.

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Superverse in Brief Blog 8

The Big Picture

 

The stories I started to write aren’t the stories they ended up at all, for where I began was in my own head. But the stories that made it to print had many fingers and opinions in the pie by then. Was that a good thing? Sometimes it was highly valued and sometimes not for none of them live in my head and have their own filters and story prejudices to deal with. That’s just the human condition.
A story of any length is littered with breadcrumbs of the authors life no matter how far fetched it is. Part of the strength of its originality is that others read it that way and to let it be different. It is why we have the likes of Vern, Hemmingway and Tolkien, why there is a Butcher and a King. How often are we fed a reading diet of only what others want to see because it is how they want those they influence to spend their time? This is not the authors doing.

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Superverse in Brief Blog 7

Heroes and Heroines of the Superverse

Stories, especially those epic in proportion are immensely challenging. No different to producing some of the mammoth sized computer games on the market today. I’m a big Fall Out 4 fan and the latest is, No Man’s Sky. Readers, like gamers, who spend big hours in their chosen genre want to be immersed. Not just “oh my, look at that”, kind of thing, but like the Epics of Hemingway, Vern or Tolkien, be truly in the fabric of those worlds. Immersion is everything in a story. It’s not just the vastness of those worlds that the writer strives for, but to pull off one of the greatest illusions ever presented, and that is, to make the reader/observer believe they are in that world.

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Superverse in Brief: Article 6

Worlds as Characters

 

Every story must have a sound environment that sets the stage for the core characters to experience their present. In the case of the Citadel 7 Superverse, that means environments of endless worlds and dimensions. No matter how short or long a story, without that the story can never come truly to life.

Yes, the characters are a point of empathy for the observing audience, but it’s often forgotten that an environment can be a character too. In fact, in my series, several characters are inextricably dovetailed as both separate from and an aspect of environment. What passes for Sci Fi in today’s world, particularly soft sci fi, in my mind blurs many boundaries and is lazy publishing. In some cases, what passes for sci fi today borders on the absurd now and might as well be thrown into Speculative fiction. Audiences are being asked to swallow a lot today, and it’s not based on story content either.

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